Close (x)

body | mind

Body | Mind


 
body | mind photoVEGGIE TALES
March is National Nutrition Month so what better time to revisit those unaccomplished New Year's "healthy eating" resolutions and get back on track. Below are some tips to simplify and de-stress the challenge of eating more fruits and veggies.

• Try using prewashed salad greens along with convenient grated carrots and grape tomatoes to make a salad in a flash.

• Pick up packages of veggies that work well as snacks such as pea pods, baby carrots or celery sticks; you will not only add more veggies but also reduce your intake of high fat and salty snack foods!

• Use your microwave to quickly cook up veggies (in the produce section you can find vegetable mixes that are cut up and ready to cook, or you can use frozen).

• Keep a bowl of fruit on the table, counter, or front and center in your refrigerator. If you see it you will likely eat it.

— Club Dietitian Cindy Farricker

FAMILY MATTERS
No matter your child's age, spending time playing and engaging helps with development. Not only will you build an invaluable bond together, but it's also a crucial opportunity to teach lessons and jump-start critical thinking skills (practicing game rules, adding blocks until a tower falls or trying to fit LEGO pieces together). Children are constantly learning, and interaction with parents and peers is the quickest way to help them learn. Playing can take on many forms, from reading to sports, to the Club's many family activities.

—Katie Barth, Recreation Director

body | mind photoSLOW AND STEADY
Increasing your strength takes time and dedication. Sticking to a consistent regime is your best bet for making an improvement. If you're new to weight training, start with a lower resistance or a lighter weight. Gradually, when it becomes easier to lift, to push and to hold, add more weight or resistance. By the end of each rep, your muscles should feel fatigued but not strained. If you're able to get through an entire set easily, it's time to make it more challenging.

—Sally Reed, Athletic Director

25 FOODS TO HELP PREVENT CANCER
Eating a well-balanced diet can help reduce your risk of several types of cancer. The Cancer Cure Foundation recommends adding these cancer-fighting foods to your diet.

• Broccoli
• Cabbage
• Cauliflower
• Carrots
• Kale
• Mushrooms
• Seaweed and other sea vegetables
• Sweet potatoes
• Avocados
• Chili peppers
• Figs
• Grapefruits
• Grapes
• Oranges
• Lemons
• Papayas
• Raspberries
• Tomatoes
• Flax seeds
• Nuts
• Garlic
• Rosemary
• Tumeric
• Soy products
• Green tea

Remember, eating healthy is the first step, but it's equally important to be physically active to help protect against cancer.

–—Overlake Hospital Medical Center

body | mind photoARE YOUR BAD HABITS RUINING YOUR SLEEP?
Most adults need 7-9 hours of sleep for optimum health. In today's busy world there are many distractions and behaviors that may interfere with a good night's rest.

Below are some bad habits to break.
• Don't sacrifice sleep during the week and sleep in on the weekend; stick to a regular daily sleep/wake schedule.

• Stop using electronic devices—computer screen, smartphone and television—two hours before your bedtime to ensure
your body produces melatonin.

• Avoid caffeine and alcohol products 4 to 6 hours before bedtime.

• Avoid strenuous exercise within 2 hours of bedtime.

—Overlake Hospital Medical Center

Overlake Hospital Medical Center


• Broccoli
• Cabbage
• Cauliflower
• Carrots
• Kale
• Mushrooms
• Seaweed and other sea vegetables
• Sweet potatoes
• Avocados
• Chili peppers
• Figs
• Grapefruits
• Grapes
• Oranges
• Lemons
• Papayas
• Raspberries
• Tomatoes
• Flax seeds
• Nuts
• Garlic
• Rosemary
• Tumeric
• Soy products
• Green tea

« BACK | PAGE: 1

Comments Closed

Bellevue North Shopping Center

Gordon James Fine Diamonds